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Six Tips for Relieving Stress Today

(CAMARILLO, CA) What Could Be More Important For Working Adults Than Avoiding Stress? How do you avoid all those interruptions at work so you can get you job done? How do you deal effectively with Telephone interruptions and Email interruptions?

Are you so OVERWORKED, totally STRESSED, or WORRIED that you are heading for a heart attack? If you've had a heart attack, or don't want to have your first one, then perhaps Brad Henson's new breakthrough strategies, secrets and tips to creating a longer, fuller, more meaningful life is EXACTLY what you're looking for.

The following easy-to-use "Six Tips for Relieving Stress Today" are excepts from his book "Heart Attack Survivor - a field guide" and will help you deal with the time robbers(c) and stress monkers'(c) in your life.

Have you ever seen the sign above a coworker's desk that reads, "A Rush on your part does not necessitate a rush on mine"? How many times have you been totally immersed on a work or home project, only to be interrupted by a boss, co-worker, or family member--- wanting you to drop everything you are doing to help THEM get their project completed.

How many times have you had people walk into your cubicle, or office unannounced, or ring you up on the phone, or email you a note...to "just take a moment of your time" to answer that really simple question? More times than you want to remember?

Once your concentration has been broken, it may take great effort, lots of stress, and many minutes, if not hours to get back "in the zone"...that you were so abruptly shaken from to get back on track. What right do they have to think that their problem is greater than yours? If it is your boss, or supervisor, they may have all the rights and privileges of the job title to ask for your assistance. If it is your wife, or significant other, you may consider this person as important as your boss and may voluntarily render yourself to their needs. When it comes to everyone else you should be able to politely say "don't bother me with your ridiculous issues and feel really good about it.

I call these types of people Stress Mongers(c), or Time Robbers(c). Don't get sucked into their own agenda's if it does not benefit you directly. Remember, "a rush on their part does not necessitate a rush on yours", and can, and WILL add stress and poor feelings toward the offender if you allow them to come into your life unannounced.

How do you stop them from this dastardly act of disrespect? There are a number of things you can do. I offer up these suggestive remedies in two parts: Telephone interruptions, Email interruptions. These are only a few of the literally hundreds of ways to stop people from robbing you of your time, and adding stress to your life. You may add your own tips and tricks to this list in the days, weeks, and years to come, to help you deal with these Stress Mongers(c), or Time Robbers(c).

Telephone interruptions

1. When you are working on a project, and don't want to be side tracked, take the phone off the hook. If you are like most people, and have an answering machine or service through your telephone provider, the caller will leave a message and you can answer and return the calls on YOUR schedule. It is OK not to be at everyone's beckoned call 24 hours a day.

2. Most phone systems have a method for leaving an "out of office" message. Do it. Say something like "I am in conference at the moment and unable to get to the phone---but will return your call as soon as I am free". Most people will understand your dilemma, and wish they had thought of using this technique themselves.

3. When the phone rings and it is someone who asks that really dumb, stupid question, you can just say I am with a client or can't talk right now. Say you will get back to them at your earliest convenience and then say "goodbye". Chances are, you are just a "habit" they formed along time ago to call to answer their questions. What might happen is they will go down the list of numbers they have until they find a willing victim. Either way, you are off the hook.

4. If you learn to rate the call on a scale of 1 to 4, then it becomes easy to determine what call is really important and which one can be put on the back burner and dealt with at a later time. It's up to you which number is lest important and which is most important. What IS important here is what you control.

Email interruptions

If you are in the workforce, you are bombarded by emails, junk mail, jokes, or trivia mail that comes in to your mailbox from people you don't even know. Here are two tips that will help you combat these intruders into your life.

5. Allocate specific times per day to read your mail. It's amazing how many minutes of "reading" email cuts into your project time.

6. If you have a calendar function (as Microsoft Exchange or Outlook does), set up a meeting for reading your mail and abide by it. It may take some discipline to learn to only read the mail during that time slot but you will find you productivity increasing 10 fold, and your stress dropping substantially by following this simple guideline.

Heart Attack Survivor - a field guide is available for $19.95 plus $3.00 shipping and handling (CA residents add 7.25% sales tax) from Crow Publishing, 2510 G - Las Posas Road, Camarillo, CA. 93010. http://www.heartattacksurvivor.com

To obtain the complete free report "12 Tips for Relieving Stress Today", send a self-addressed stamped envelope requesting a copy, OR:

Send a blank e-mail message to: stresstips@freeautobot.com.

What Readers are saying about Heart Attack Survivor...

Dick Butkus, NFL Hall of Famer and Chicago Bear Legend has graciously said about "Heart Attack Survivor" -

I picked up your book at Steve Thomas BMW last Thurs. Friday I had a flight from LAX to Pittsburgh and I couldn't put the book down the whole trip! So much of the "stuff" one goes thru after an attack or even the 5-way bypass I experienced was dealt with in a very thought provoking manner. It is Sunday night and I have tried a few of the suggestions and can honestly say that there has been a change in my attitude in two short days. I have roughly 787 marbles to go! Thank you for reminding me to make them all count,- Dick Butkus

Dr. Richard Carlson, author of "Don't Sweat the Small Stuff" says about Heart Attack Survivor - a field guide "Practical, helpful, and full of great life affirming advice. Anyone with a heart, healthy or not, will enjoy this book!"

Like Chicken Soup for the Soul - Only Tastier! - Ira from Los Angeles, CA

"A Guide for Living" - Vi, Camarillo, CA

Brad's BIO Brad Henson is a survivor of the "corporate wars" for the last 17 years. After having a heart attack at age 35, he is alive today to teach people how to live a Stress-free Outrageously Happy and Fulfilled Life.

Author Brad Henson is available for interviews and shows. We will send free review copies to members of the working press. Please send us an email it to press@heartattacksurvivor.com or by calling (805)-484-8003


Is your personality killing you? Mine almost did! Are YOU "overworked, totally stressed, or worried that you are heading for a heart attack"? "Heart Attack Survivor - a field guide" is the answer. Click=> http://www.heartattacksurvivor.com


Synopsis A book about how to live free from the stress, fear, anger, negative feelings, and unresolved lifestyle challenges that contribute to heart attacks.


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Copyright 2004 (c) All rights Reserved. - from the book
"Heart Attack Survivor - field guide - ISBN: 0971278806

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